Medical Team Supplies Help Dr. Ruth Noemi

Editor’s Note: Each month, we mail an article with our contribution statements to that month’s donors. Click here to download a PDF version.

Written by SIFAT co-founder Sarah Corson

An urgent call came to Benjo from Dr. Ruth Noemi Mamani in Quesimpuco, Bolivia. Because this is an isolated area, we had hope that the coronavirus would not reach this place, which Tom still calls “the end of the world.” But, a group of youth from Quesimpuco had gone to Chile and Argentina to find work. As the outbreak started, they rushed to get home, crossing the border illegally. They made it home, but brought the virus with them. Dr. Ruth Noemi did not have gloves, masks or protective gear for the health workers helping her.

Dr. Ruth Noemi leads a public health initiative in the Quesimpuco area.


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SIFAT’s Response to the Coronavirus Outbreak

as of April 3, 2020

Click here to download a PDF of our March 12, 2020 statement.

Click here to download a letter to group leaders of upcoming campus events. (March 12, 2020)

April 3, 2020 Update

Thank You to our SIFAT Family

We always train mission team members to be flexible and know that schedules and plans may change at any time. This year, that lesson has become truer than we could have imagined. Since early March, groups planning to participate in campus programming have postponed or canceled events as everyone tries to self quarantine and prevent the rapid spread of the coronavirus. Some of our international mission teams have chosen to wait until 2021 to travel, while others are waiting to see if it will be safe to travel later this year. We are optimistic that at least one construction and medical team made up of members from different teams will be able to serve in both Bolivia and Ecuador this fall. Needless to say, March has been an uncertain time for our staff as our plans evolve.

Throughout this month, we have prayed for guidance as we make important decisions for the health and safety of our staff, participants and communities in which we serve. SIFAT’s work continues, even during self quarantine. Many of our staff members are working from home, while our campus staff are doing maintenance projects and preparing for when guests return to our campus. Meetings about upcoming community development trainings are being held through phone or video calls. Our graduates in countries around the world are contacting us to ask how SIFAT is doing, while they are facing the same challenges in their ministries as SIFAT is. You can visit www.sifat.org/coronavirus for updates about our response to COVID-19.

One of our greatest encouragements is your continued support. We have received emails and phone calls from our SIFAT family to check on our staff, international projects and campus programs. Unexpected donations have arrived in the mail. Our monthly donors’ gifts have not changed. While we do not know how long this pandemic will last or what the long-term effects on our economy will be, we are grateful for your faithfulness in supporting SIFAT.  Thank you!

March 12, 2020 Statement

SIFAT has been following the CDC, the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Department of State and local authorities to make decisions regarding the 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) in Alabama and at our international project sites. We are making every effort possible to keep those participating in SIFAT’s campus programs and international projects healthy and safe, as well as our staff and the communities in which we serve abroad.  SIFAT is taking a proactive approach to keep potential exposure to the virus minimal for everyone involved. We hope we do not have to make broad cancellations, but if the outbreak reaches that point, we will communicate with each group and team affected.

International Teams in Bolivia and Ecuador: In March, two of our international mission teams to Ecuador chose to err on the side of caution and postpone their trips until later this year. Currently, SIFAT staff members are reviewing U.S. government agencies’ travel guidelines regularly, communicating with our in-country directors for the most recent reports and advisements from Bolivia and Ecuador and discussing travel options with our team leaders.

Our major concern is the health and safety not only for our team members who must travel through airports and large crowds to reach their destinations, but also for the communities in which we serve. These areas may not be prepared or equipped to successfully address an outbreak of the virus. We do not want to potentially expose vulnerable villages or neighborhoods to this virus through accidental transmission from our visiting teams.

Our international team coordinator will be working with each team leader to make the best decision for that team’s trip.

Campus Programs in Alabama: Because we receive groups from throughout the Southeast, we want to ensure the safety of staff and local community, as well as our participants. At this time, we have suspended visits to our campus by international travelers until further notice.

Our normal routine of cleaning our facilities is being expanded. Our staff is taking the initiative to learn and implement the best techniques to effectively sanitize our lodging, bathrooms and cafeteria prior to groups arriving and after they depart. Additionally, daily disinfection of frequently touched objects and surfaces is being performed by our hospitality team. Frequent hand washing is being encouraged through reminders from our staff leading each group’s activities. We ask that visitors on campus follow good health hygiene recommendations from the CDC, which are being sent to group leaders prior to each group’s visit. Our campus nurse is available for consultation if someone exhibits symptoms that could be related to COVID-19.

Our campus staff is available to discuss concerns or make schedule changes for groups who wish to modify their programming.

Quesimpuco: A Renewed Motivation in Bolivia

Editor’s Note: Each month, we mail articles with our contribution statements. You can download a copy of the article to share with your church or civic organization.

March 2020, Written by SIFAT Co-founder Sarah Corson

Benjo Paredes and Ken Corson started CENATEC, a Christian nonprofit, more than 42 years ago. He has led the way to take the Gospel to thousands of Bolivians, taught seminars, helped 85 villages get clean water and helped thousands of people have more food to eat. But, the years have taken their toll.

Benjo is 80 years old now. His son Isaac had taken Benjo’s place as director of CENATEC,  because Benjo was getting older and had back trouble. Some days, he could hardly walk. Dimmed eyesight. Joints swollen with arthritis. His whole body was just worn out from more than 40 years traveling a 500-mile circuit over the rugged Andes Mountains. He had given most of his life to help his people. He could do no more.

Benjo leads misison team members on a project in Quesimpuco, Bolivia.


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Graduate Project: Ministering in a Refugee Camp

February 2020, Written by SIFAT Co-founder Sarah Corson

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God. For as we share abundantly in Christ’s sufferings, so through Christ we share abundantly in comfort too.”          2 Cor. 1:3-5

Bullen, SIFAT’s only graduate from South Sudan, recently sent a letter to SIFAT that began with this Bible verse. He knows from the core of his being what affliction means, and just as real to him is the God of all comfort.

His people have been exploited and enslaved for centuries by the Arab Northern Sudanese fighting for ivory, slaves and later, oil, against the African Southern Sudanese. Finally, South Sudan gained its freedom and joined the United Nations as the world’s 193rd nation in 2011. But in less than a year, terrible atrocities were started again, and the population in this war-torn, impoverished nation is suffering enslavement, savage acts of torture and destruction of life and property.

Bullen, a SIFAT graduate from South Sudan, is ministering in a refugee camp in Uganda. With help from SIFAT supporters, he has built a church that has a garden around it.


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Ecuador: Intern Luci’s Last Post

Editor’s Note: High school junior Luci Bryson, daughter of SIFAT training director Kathy Bryson, is spending six weeks this summer as an intern with SIFAT Ecuador. Having already been part of Learn & Serve programming and training events both on our Galilee Campus and internationally, Luci is helping our teams in Ecuador and improving her Spanish translating skills. You can read her first entry and second entry.

It’s been one week since I’ve returned to Sweet Home Alabama. I’ve never felt more exhausted in my life, but I’m warm and content. Today is my second day at home as we went to Brasher Springs Camp Meeting and the Flippen-Shaw-Barkley family reunion. Wednesday, Jennessa, Evie and I are traveling to visit Brianna in Chicago. It’s been seven months since we’ve last all been together, so it will be nice to use this little window of time before Jennessa goes back to school in Boston, and Evie and I start our new life in Costa Rica with Mom. If it’s one thing from this summer that I’ve learned, it’s how much of an importance family has.

But family is a broad term.

During her summer in Ecuador, Luci found an extended family in Aida Leon.

 


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